Pure Moods

tales of a charm city chick

When I was a dorky 13-year-old, I bought the Pure Moods compilation CD after seeing an infomercial for it at a sleepover. There was something about it that drew me in, something bewitching.  If you’ve never heard of it, please, watch the commercial and find yourself as enchanted as I was:

Are you under the Pure Moods spell yet? Thought so. There’s probably a mist rising all around you at this very moment.

The song from this extraordinary compilation that really got me was “Return to Innocence” by Enigma. Watch this magical tribute to wolves whilst the song makes gentle love to your ears (for optimal results, please listen as you continue on your literary journey):

So at this awkward stage in my life when I wore a headgear and was the same weight I am now, my biggest dream ever was to kiss a boy and whenever I listened…

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What if Woody Wore Pink?

Dr. Rebecca Hains

What would you think of Woody from Toy Story if he wore pink?

Woody from Toy Story with pink bandanaWould you think the color choice was incongruous—that it didn’t seem masculine enough for a 1950s-era cowboy toy?

Well, you’d be wrong. Check out these images from the 1955 Sears Christmas Book catalog that Elizabeth Sweet, a newly minted Ph.D. from the University of California at Davis, sent me. Here’s Roy Rogers Apparel, featuring Roy Rogers and his son, Dusty–who is wearing a cowboy outfit with red, yellow, and pink accents:

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To modern eyes, this is surprising. “Pink is a girls’ color,” we think. This association has become so firmly entrenched in our cultural imagination that people are flabbergasted to learn that until the 1950s, pink was often considered a strong color and, therefore, was associated with boys.

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